The March for Jesus moved through downtown Saturday, bringing together hundreds of worshippers from different Suffolk churches for a common cause. They were united in their wish to publicly proclaim their faith in God.
The March for Jesus moved through downtown Saturday, bringing together hundreds of worshippers from different Suffolk churches for a common cause. They were united in their wish to publicly proclaim their faith in God.

Archived Story

Marchers proclaim faith

Published 8:35pm Saturday, June 29, 2013

Worshippers hit the streets of Suffolk on Saturday, marching from the Seaboard Station to Constant’s Wharf Park to proclaim their faith in Jesus.

Event co-organizer Win Anderson said it was the first March for Jesus since 2007. About 150 marchers set out down Main Street, he said, and up to 500 attended a rally at

Constant’s Wharf Park.

“We’re very excited that this many folks turned out,” he said.

Marchers proceeded down Main Street under police escort, letting their faith be known with songs of praise, banners, and even kudu-horn trumpets.

Many cars honked their horns in passing, occupants yelling their support through the window.

“We want people to know we are not afraid to publicly announce that we love Christ,” said one marcher, Okpun Langley.

“We want to glorify His name, (to say) that the only thing that matters is to lift His name up and to bring the churches together to praise him and worship him.”

According to Teddy Wilson, marching alongside Betsey Newman, the march was “just to glorify God.”

From about 9:30 a.m., the rally at Constant’s Wharf saw the marchers joined by many others sharing their faith.

The house band, led by Calvin Simmons, made sure every available space of time was filled with music.

Dance, prayer and praise were all part of the program. Keynote speaker was Bishop E.W. Jackson, the Republican Party’s candidate for lieutenant governor, who implored his audience to put their faith in God above all else.

During prayer, Anderson asked God to “bless every sinner.”

“We ask You to change our minds, grant us the spirit of repentance,” he said.

Anderson is vice president of Impact Suffolk, which started in 1995 to “develop partnerships with ministries in Suffolk’s neighborhoods and surrounding areas to unite church, proclaim the gospel and serve the community.”

 

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