Hannah Hamrick, 3, and Emma Hamrick, 4, smile for the camera with mom Leslie Gwaltney Hamrick at the inaugural Chuckatuck Founders’ Day celebrations in 2012. This year’s event is set for this weekend.
Hannah Hamrick, 3, and Emma Hamrick, 4, smile for the camera with mom Leslie Gwaltney Hamrick at the inaugural Chuckatuck Founders’ Day celebrations in 2012. This year’s event is set for next weekend.

Founder’s Day returns to Chuckatuck

Published 11:36pm Monday, October 14, 2013

The Greater Chuckatuck Historical Foundation is inviting folks to kick up their heels at the second annual Founder’s Day on Oct. 26.

After a parade through the village on Kings Highway, the event will continue with music, food and fun at the Chuckatuck Volunteer Fire Department, said Kitty Martin of Kitty’s Beauty Salon.

“We are hoping that people will come out and enjoy it,” the co-chair of the event with Sammy Copeland said.

Hurricane Sandy dampened 2012’s inaugural event, limiting attendance to somewhat fewer than the 500 organizers had hoped for.

This year, she said, they’re hoping for 500 to 1,000 people, and after the village’s National Night Out celebrations attracted 1,400, that number seems possible.

The Rhondels will provide 1950s tunes that Martin hopes will have folks up and dancing.

“People can come dressed in that 1950s style,” she said.

A number of vendors will set up in the fire department building, where activities will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. after the parade gets under way outside Jimmy’s Pizza and Subs.

“The parade will finish at Bob House Parkway,” Martin said. “The city would only allow us to go so far.”

Halloween-themed kids’ activities, she said, will include face painting, pumpkin decorating, Halloween costume contest and games.

Girl scouts from Troop 5563 will be doing the face painting, and members of Boy Scout Troop 25 will be there for parking and other duties.

The historical foundation will have a table, selling bags, T-shirts and copies of “Chuckatuck — A Crossroads in Time,” Martin added.

Fittingly, Martin said, Chief Barry Bass of the Nansemond Indians has been selected as the event’s grand marshal.

“We wanted him to be a part, because their land is a part of our community,” she said, referring to 70 acres the city recently conveyed to the tribe, where it plans to develop an educational tourist attraction, Mattanock Town, recreating the tribe’s 1600s village that was located near the site.

The Oakland Elementary School chorus will also perform, Martin said, and she hopes the event’s focus on involving children will bring families out to Chuckatuck.

The free event is “helping promote the history” of the village and surrounding area, and “bringing the community together,” including folks from outlying communities such as Reids Ferry and Hobson.

“We’ll bring old friends together and create new friends,” Martin said.

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