Archived Story

Video business wins award

Published 11:08pm Thursday, July 24, 2014

A Suffolk franchise came home from a conference last weekend with the Seven Stars Award for general excellence and commitment to quality and service.

Arthur Bradshaw’s Home Video Studio earned the business’ award, which is given to only 10 percent of the company’s 70 franchises in the United States, Canada and Sweden. It was the second year in a row he had received the award, and he has been in the business only four years.

Arthur Bradshaw shows off his Seven Stars Award from Home Video Studio. His franchise, which he operates from his North Suffolk home, was recognized for general excellence.
Arthur Bradshaw shows off his Seven Stars Award from Home Video Studio. His franchise, which he operates from his North Suffolk home, was recognized for general excellence.

He also was nominated for three individual Hanley Award categories at the conference in Orlando.

“Just to be nominated was good,” he said. “I’m one of the top, and that’s pretty good.”

The business, which Bradshaw operates out of his North Suffolk home, does a variety of work that ranges from shooting and editing corporate video and promotions to converting outdated media, such as VHS tapes, slides and negatives, to digital form.

“I make a lot of people happy,” Bradshaw said. “Fourth quarter is really busy, with people doing Christmas gifts. I like it because I make people happy.”

Bradshaw started the business in 2010 after leaving his sales job with International Paper.

“With everything that was going on, I was looking for a change,” he said. His wife stumbled across Home Video Studio online.

“She said, ‘You might want to give them a call,’” Bradshaw said.

Past awards he has won included a Hanley Award for his documentary about the Chuckatuck book, “Crossroads in Time,” and also for company promotions for a couple of local businesses.

But the part of his work that really makes people happy often comes from families preserving their mementos.

“Tape will disintegrate over time,” he said. Converting it to digital form “is a way to preserve it so you don’t have to worry about it.”

Bradshaw also gave credit to his two employees, Luke Rockswold and Chloe Tillman.

He said he plans to move the business out of his house and into a storefront next year.

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