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Election slate set

Suffolk voters could find some new faces at their doors or in their mailboxes in the coming weeks.

A total of 11 candidates hope to be elected on Nov. 8 to represent parts of Suffolk in the Virginia General Assembly. A statewide redistricting process this year split Suffolk among four Senate and five House districts, some of which have never before overlapped with the city’s boundaries.

In addition to the state offices, voters have a couple of local choices to make, as well.

A longtime favorite senator, Fred Quayle, is not among the choices. He decided to step down in favor of his friend, Harry B. Blevins, when the two were drawn into the same district as part of the state’s redistricting process.

The bill that sacrificed Quayle came after Gov. Robert McDonnell vetoed a prior measure that would have eliminated a Virginia Beach senator, instead. After last year’s census results showed tepid growth in most of Hampton Roads (despite a nearly 33-percent jump in Suffolk), the region had to lose a seat to the burgeoning Northern Virginia area.

Among the Senate districts, Republicans Blevins and Thomas K. Norment Jr. and Democrat L. Louise Lucas are running unopposed for their seats. All are incumbents.

But one contested race is on tap for Senate. Incumbent John C. Miller, a Democrat, faces challenging Republican Mickey P. Chohany for the First District seat. Only the Harbour View precinct votes with the First District.

On the House of Delegates side, Republican S. Chris Jones and Democrats Lionell Spruill Sr., Johnny S. Joannou and Matthew James all are running uncontested campaigns to return to their seats.

But incumbent Democrat William K. Barlow faces a challenge from Republican Rick L. Morris for the 64th District seat. Most of the southwestern part of the city will vote in this race.

In local elections, incumbent Clerk of Court W. Randolph “Randy” Carter Jr. is unchallenged in his bid to return to his job. And two candidates, Richard A. Gwaltney and Travis W. Williams, are making a run for seats on the Peanut District Soil and Water Conservation Board.

Voters can check their registration status, see what’s on their ballot, find their polling places and get other election information by visiting www.sbe.virginia.gov.