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Epperson wins another Emmy

Suffolk native Danny Epperson added another Emmy to his collection for his work on “Guardians of Jamestown 1619.”

“There is a lot you go through to get the award, and to get it is cool,” Epperson said. “It goes to show you that all of that labor of love you put into it is recognized by your peers.”

The Emmy was given by the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences on June 23. Epperson won as a producer in the informational/instructional program or special category.

“Guardians of Jamestown 1619,” is a scripted web series consisting of seven short videos that educate viewers about important Jamestown events that happened in 1619, such as the arrival of English women, the arrival of the first Africans, the influence of tobacco, the first English Thanksgiving and the first General Assembly meeting in Virginia.

WHRO was approached by the American Evolution to produce this as an educational series for schools across Virginia. The videos are available across the country, but the subject matter focuses on the Virginia Standards of Learning, Epperson said.

This labor of love lasted for nine months from start to finish, and Epperson tried to include as many local Virginians as possible. Scenes within the series were shot in Historic Jamestown and the Jamestown Settlement.

“Working in both places was a challenge, because they don’t normally work together,” Epperson said.

Epperson also handled a lot of work that was being done for the completion of the series. Not only did he write the script and do the research to ensure its accuracy, but Epperson also handled all the editing.

“Here at WHRO, we do everything,” Epperson said.

One of the only things Epperson didn’t do was the animation, but he had contracted Ken Nishimoto for the animation work.

The project was worth the nine months of work because he knew the intended audience, young students, would enjoy what he did.

“I’ve always enjoyed being around kids and seeing how their minds work, and I got the chance to consult with educators,” Epperson said. “I got to know what things kids thought were cool, and I made sure that everything came together. It was a fun combination of making something fun and letting them learn.”

Epperson has a lengthy resume, and he has accomplished plenty in his career, but this project was something new for him.

“I had never done an animated project before,” Epperson said. “This was the first time to combine live action and animation, and for me, it was challenging.”

Epperson hopes that he can continue to challenge himself in his career.

“Give me something new, because that is a good way for me to continue growing,” Epperson said.