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Need some stuff?

Planning to dress up as a wolf for Halloween? A prisoner? Alien? Soldier?

Or perhaps you’re looking to furnish a new home. Or redecorate your old home.

Starting your own production company? You’ll probably need cameras, lights and microphones.

Or maybe you need a luxurious two-body morgue freezer. And fake dead bodies to go in it.

If you fit in any of those categories, you’ll want to bid on some things in the New Dominion Pictures auction.

The Suffolk-based production company isn’t shutting down, but is refocusing and auctioning off surplus materials they’ve acquired over 15 years of producing award-winning television shows.

“Over the years, we just ended up collecting a ton of stuff,” said David O’Donnell, vice president for development at New Dominion Pictures.

“Most of our programming has been reenactment based, which has required sets and wardrobe and props and makeup,” O’Donnell said. “Most of the new programming we’re developing now doesn’t require that, because the programming landscape is changing and we’re adapting to it.

“We don’t need all of this stuff.”

Many people recognize New Dominion’s successful series “The FBI Files,” “The New Detectives,” “A Haunting,” “Ghost Stories,” and “The Prosecutors.” Fans of those and other programs will especially get a kick out of owning props and wardrobe items used in the reenactments, O’Donnell said.

Production companies, businesses and homeowners also will benefit from the thousands of pieces of equipment, furniture, office supplies, home décor and more.

The auction will take place Oct. 10 and 11 at New Dominion, 1000 Film Way, off of Hillpoint Boulevard. On-site registration will begin at 8 a.m., and auctioning begins at 9 a.m. Online bidding will also be available at www.auctionnetwork.com. Bidders either at the site or on the Web will be able to bid for more than 1,500 lots, ranging from televisions to a bird cage to a fake chest bomb.

Also on the list are children’s toys, glassware, luggage, generators, firefighter helmets, rugs, VCRs, masks, skeletons, vases, hospital equipment and more.

“Everybody, at some point, says we gotta clean out the closets,” O’Donnell said.