Council to discuss street name changes

Published 10:41 pm Monday, November 16, 2009

Street name conflicts, transportation plans, bulk refuse fees and a ropes course on White Marsh Road all are on the City Council agenda for Wednesday evening.

A work session will begin at 4 p.m. in City Council chambers, 441 Market St. The regular meeting will begin at 7 p.m.

Council members will hear a staff report during the work session on proposed street name and address changes for some northern Suffolk neighborhoods. City staff have been investigating the potential for changing some street names this year, after a series of construction projects created disjointed sections of several roads.

Four changes are proposed for parts of Townpoint Road and College Drive. Six homes in the 6300-6400 blocks of Townpoint Road are proposed to have new address numbers with an “Old Townpoint Road” name. Seven duplexes in the 6400 block of Townpoint Road would have new address numbers with an “Old College Drive” name.

In addition, residential areas within Huntersville and Wynnewood neighborhoods fronting on College Drive and Townpoint Road are proposed to change to Old College Drive and Old Townpoint Road. Address numbers would stay the same. Also, a section of Townpoint Road between River Club Drive and the border with Portsmouth would be changed to Hampton Roads Parkway, with the same address numbers.

Also during the work session, City Council will discuss the transportation capital improvements plan for the next 10 years.

During the regular meeting, Council has on its agenda an ordinance change to return to free bulk refuse pickup for piles of eight cubic feet or less beginning Dec. 1. The city tried to implement a fee of $20 to pick up piles of less than eight cubic feet, but complaints from residents spurred them to use a surplus to return to free service.

Also during the regular meeting, Council members will consider a conditional use permit request for an outdoor low ropes course facility on White Marsh Road. The property owners, Lawrence Peck and Melina Winterton, hope to bring in groups for leadership training involving the course.