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SEA funds a dozen new programs

The Suffolk Education Foundation has announced its financial support for the following classroom instructional programs, which will impact more than 3,500 students during the 2016-2017 school year.

The Suffolk Education Foundation has funded close to $280,000 in instructional grants through the years.

  • Reading Fun: It’s in the Bag: Booker T. Washington Elementary School — Students in the Early Start preschool classes will benefit from an interactive, take-home literacy program. Kids will take home the book bags twice a month, and each will include books and related family activities to support reading readiness skills. ($460 – Ruth Harrel)
  • Enhancing Music Program with Suzuki Hand Chimes: John Yeates Middle School — Chorus students do more than sing. They also learn rhythm concepts, note reading and the relation of melody and harmony. The grant will add a basic two-octave set of hand chimes to complement music lessons. ($870 – Laurie Curtis)
  • Study Island: Differentiated Instruction: King’s Fork Middle School — Seventh-grade students will benefit from one-on-one tutorial sessions, which are designed in a fun, game-like atmosphere. The online “Study Island” will enhance math and science lessons. ($2,000 – Michelle Ingram)
  • An Island by Myself, No More: Forest Glen Middle School — Students will benefit from one-on-one tutorial sessions, which are designed in a fun, game-like atmosphere. The online “Study Island” will enhance reading and math lessons for all grade levels. ($2,000 – Kimberly Bynum)
  • Break Point Computation and Estimation: Oakland Elementary School — Adding tennis lessons during physical education classes, students will practice such math concepts as computation and estimation. ($935 – Anne McCoy)
  • Expansion of Biomedical Sciences Program: Lakeland High School — Students in the citywide, high school specialty program will design solutions to real-world, complex health programs. Funds will be used to purchase the necessary science laboratory equipment and supplies. ($2,000 – Sarah McDonald)
  • Organic Chemistry Lab: King’s Fork High School — Students will benefit from laboratory glassware kits designed to support organic chemistry experiments, which will provide students hands-on insight into textbook formulas. ($1,351 — Sharon Criner)
  • Electronic Balances for Science Labs: Nansemond River High School — Science students enrolled in biology, earth science, and chemistry will benefit from 10 electronic balances to meet state standards for real-world, hands-on experiments. ($1,800 – Deborah Oliver)
  • Coding with LEGO Robotics: John Yeates Middle School — Students will design, build, and program LEGO robot kits as part of the after-school CHROME science club during the program’s first year. In the second year, students will participate in a statewide LEGO robotics competition league. ($1,963 – Leslie Bulger)
  • Hands-On Weather: King’s Fork High School — Earth science students will learn with hands-on kits to teach about climate cycles, atmospheric pressure and El Nino/La Nina effects. The equipment will allow for more cooperative learning and could build lifelong weather warriors. ($449 – Ann Bailey)
  • Interactive Visual Lessons: Nansemond River High School — Students will benefit from a wireless interactive whiteboard system, providing opportunities to share writing lessons and provide real-time peer feedback. This technology package will be a pilot project. ($187 – Jennifer Leighton)
  • Data Loggers & Probe Ware: King’s Fork High School — Biology students are required to understand how scientists work and communicate with each other, using current technology for scientific collection and analysis of data throughout the year. ($1,900 – Sherri Story)

Awards are made following an application process and review by a committee from the Suffolk Education Foundation’s board of directors. Selection criteria include academic impact on the most students, collaboration with other programs, and potential for sustainability.