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Social distancing has no color

By Tonya S. Swindell

Social distancing has no color when caring people value each other. With mutual respect as our goal, it is possible for everyone to become whole.

Social distancing has no color when responsible people support one another and make constructive changes to decrease the ills that plague us.

Social distancing has no color among a sympathetic group of neighbors and others who are bound by principles that unite instead of separated by problems that divide.

Social distancing has no color when one person assists with bolstering another by providing for the forgotten and uplifting the downtrodden.

Social distancing has no color when it comes to a sister or a brother who avoids causing others alarm by abstaining from actions that could cause harm.

Social distancing has no color. It doesn’t serve a particular group or another. It is for individuals who need assistance and are dedicated to having persistence.

Social distancing has no color. It doesn’t favor one political group or the other. It is working together for positive change through a useful technique to minimize pain.

Social distancing has no color. It has affected business owners and others who are creating changes in industry to curb our nation’s history.

Social distancing has no color. It is difficult for a loving mother who knows that her active children can’t go back to their school building.

Social distancing has no color. It supersedes issues that have haunted our culture, like gender, race and nationality. It highlights the need for civility.

Social distancing has no color. It is needed for people who may be “under” — underrepresented, underpaid and people making minimum wage.

Social distancing has no color. Participants agree to work with each other by refraining from offering a physical embrace so our society can gradually win a race.

Social distancing has no color. It influences the lives of a significant number of people who have faced the reality that this is all about mortality.

Social distancing has no color. We’re thankful for people that have recovered. And we pray that many recuperate as others avoid the unwanted fate.

Social distancing has no color. It is for people committed to fight for each other. Through faith, hope and charity, may we preserve our nation’s posterity.

Tonya Swindell is an occupational therapist. She is also a teacher for Kingdom Building Institute (kingdombuildinginstitute.org). She can be reached at tonyathewriter1@gmail.com.