Journalism: not just a job, but a calling

Published 7:59 pm Saturday, August 1, 2009

In the newspaper history we have the luxury each and every day to document history. That’s what today’s newspaper is … history.

The newspaper provides a valuable resource years later to those who want to look back and reflect on what made news, what made history, a set number of years ago.

This past week, I had the chance to hear a presentation on Riddick’s Folly and, as a newcomer to Suffolk, was enthralled at the stories shared.

How much fun would it have been to see the first brick home — and at the time the largest — being built? I wonder how the newspaper of the time would have covered such a dramatic event.

Today, such a construction project would very likely not find its story told in the newspaper. But back then, what a story to behold.

We have a hard time understanding what will be deemed important generations from now as they look back on the hopefully preserved copies of the Suffolk News-Herald.

Will they want to look back and research the onset of the swine flu or the debate over just what was to become of the Obici House? Regardless of the information they are seeking, it is a special job we have to document it.

From obituaries to wedding and engagement announcements to land transactions and police reports, we aim to document the time, the people and their stories that make today so special.

Over the coming days and weeks you will notice some changes to the newspaper in how we present the news and the information we publish each day. But while there will be change, our core mission remains the same … to be your newspaper and to tell your stories.

I have often times told young journalists and those still seeking their degrees in journalism that this profession is not purely a job. Rather, this job is a calling.

And while it is our job to do, it relies on the people in our communities to do that job well.

We welcome your feedback and your suggestions on the stories you want us to tell.